solar power


Credit: J. Rogers

Minnesota’s Solar Boom and… Bob Dylan?

, senior energy analyst

Those of us that track such things remember a time not long ago when the idea of a solar energy boom in Minnesota might have gotten you a funny look. But in a nod to Bob Dylan and his home state of Minnesota, I can only say: the times they are a-changin. Read more >

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Courtesy: hint.fm/wind

Rick Perry and the “Texas Approach” to Renewable Energy and Infrastructure

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Rick Perry—Trump’s pick for the Department of Energy—saw how infrastructure can impact energy development when he was governor of Texas.
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Michigan Finally Moves Forward on Clean Energy, As the Final Bell Tolls on 2016 Session

, senior energy analyst

As the last day of Michigan’s 2016 legislative session came to an end, legislators finally came to agreement on energy legislation (Senate bills 437 and 438) that settles some long-standing disputes, improves Michigan’s ability to plan for ongoing changes in its energy mix, and makes some (but not necessarily enough) progress toward Michigan’s clean energy future. As the legislation heads to Governor Snyder’s desk for signature, let’s take a quick look at some of the key clean energy provisions and how they will help shape a cleaner, more sustainable and affordable energy future for Michigan. Read more >

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Clean energy financing programs could support deployment of solar energy projects, such as this community solar farm in Edgecomb, Maine (ReVision Energy).

A Powerful Investment: Clean Energy Financing in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

These three states could leverage $35 million of public funds into a $748 million investment in renewable energy and energy efficiency projects over the next 15 years. Read more >

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Eyes on the Solar Photovoltaic Revolution: 35 Years in a Front-Row Seat

Howard Branz, , UCS

When I got into solar energy research in 1981, I wanted to change the world. I worried to my father that I’d never see widespread use of solar energy in my lifetime. That made him worry, too—about my future job prospects. As it turned out, there were plenty of jobs and I got to play my part in the history of human technology. I was one of a dedicated legion of scientists, engineers, technicians, laboratories and companies who eventually made photovoltaic cells into a commodity product: durable panels that achieve a miraculous-seeming conversion of sunlight to electricity, without needing any moving parts.

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