carbon reductions


Photo: Omari Spears/UCS

50% by 2035 National Renewable Electricity Standard Would Boost Economy and Cut Carbon Emissions

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

Today, Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) and several others introduced The Renewable Electricity Standard Act of 2019, a bill that would more than double the supply of renewable energy from 18% of US electricity generation in 2018 to at least 50% by 2035. It’s a strong proposal that builds on the recent clean energy momentum in the states and establishes a long-term national policy for renewable energy. A new UCS analysis shows that a national renewable electricity standard (RES) of 50% by 2035 would boost the economy, benefit consumers, and put the nation on a pathway to decarbonize the power sector by 2050.

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Photo: Omari Spears/UCS
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Photo: UCS

Wind Keeps Creating Jobs, Even as We Pull Out of Paris

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

President Trump announced last week that he was pulling the United States out of the Paris Climate Agreement because, he said, it would impose “draconian financial and economic burdens” on the US. This classic fossil fuel industry rhetoric of pitting the economy against the environment (in this case the climate and future of our planet) has been proven time and time again to be a false choice. The latest, impressive US wind industry results show that more clearly than ever. Read more >

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Xcel’s Plan to Cut Carbon 60 percent is Affordable and Will Benefit Minnesota’s Economy

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

Growing up in Minnesota, I have very fond memories of going fishing with my Dad in the land of 10,000 lakes.  Whether it was slaying crappies on Lake Minnetonka or catching walleyes on our summer trips to Bemidji, I’ll never forget the times we had enjoying Minnesota’s great outdoors. Read more >

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EPA Clean Power Plan Underestimates Power of Renewable Energy to Reduce Carbon Emissions

, , director of energy research, Clean Energy

UCS released a new analysis today showing that strengthening the contribution from renewable energy can significantly increase the emissions reductions from the EPA’s 2014 Clean Power Plan. We found that increasing non-hydro renewable energy sources from about 6 percent of U.S. electricity sales today to 23 percent by 2030—or nearly twice as much renewable energy as the EPA proposed—could raise the reductions in U.S. power plant carbon emissions from the EPA’s estimated 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030 to 40 percent. We also found that increasing renewables to these levels is affordable, resulting in little impact on electricity prices and lowering natural gas prices for both utilities and consumers. Read more >

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EIA’s Analysis of Bingaman Clean Energy Standard Underestimates Role of Renewable Energy

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

On May 2, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a new analysis of The Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012, proposed by Sen. Bingaman (D-NM), which greatly underestimates the potential contribution of renewable energy while making overly optimistic projections for nuclear power. The so-called “clean” energy standard (CES) would require electric utilities to gradually increase their power supply from low- and no-carbon sources from 24 percent in 2015 to 84 percent in 2035. More details on the bill, along with several improvements, are discussed in a separate UCS blog. Read more >

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