climate impacts


The view from aerial tour of Hurricane Sandy damage of New Jersey's barrier beaches, Nov. 18, 2012. (Official White House Photo by Sonya N. Hebert)

Building the Right Project: An Engineer’s Perspective on Infrastructure Adaptation to Extreme Weather Events

Dr. Cris B. Liban, P.E., ENV SP, , UCS

Infrastructure Week 2018 is upon us, and it’s important that we highlight the state of our nation’s infrastructure and why it’s critical to our economy, society, security, and future. So what is the status of our infrastructure? Read more >

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Extended crop rotations, which often include small grains like oats, pictured here, can provide financial benefits to farmers while also providing broader environmental benefits, like reduced soil erosion and runoff. Nick Ohde/Practical Farmers of Iowa

Crop Diversity: A Nice Thing If You Can Get It (and You Can Get It If You Try)

Gabrielle Roesch-McNally, PhD, , UCS

Diversity is incredibly important for a productive and resilient agrifood system. Diverse cropping systems can lead to greater  productivity, profitability and environmental health. Diversity in the form of extended crop rotations can also reduce weed, insect, and disease pressure, which can help farmers cut the costs of their purchased inputs like herbicides and insecticides. Beyond these financial benefits, diversifying crop rotations also provides broader environmental benefits that can be experienced at both the field scale (e.g., reduced erosion) and landscape scale (e.g., reduced water quality impairment), as noted in the UCS report Rotating Crops, Turning ProfitsRead more >

Nick Ohde /Practical Farmers of Iowa
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Spring in the Blue Ridge Mountains, along the Rocky Broad River in the Bat Cave Preserve.

Timing, Pollinators, and the Impact of Climate Change

Amy E. Boyd, , UCS

Periodically in the spring, I have the pleasure of teaching Plant Taxonomy to students at a small college in Asheville, North Carolina. Among other things, I love the way that teaching this class forces me to pay close attention to what is coming out of the ground, leafing out, or flowering at any particular point of the season in the Blue Ridge Mountains where our campus is nestled. Read more >

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A Honduran farmer digs irrigation channels in advance of maize planting.
A maize farmer near Alauca, Honduras, digs irrigation channels in advance of maize planting. Photo: Neil Palmer, CIAT/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 - Flickr

Making Agriculture “Climate-Smart” in Latin America and the Caribbean

Sharon Gourdji, , UCS

I recently returned to the United States from Cali, Colombia where I worked for the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (or CIAT, its Spanish-language abbreviation) for a couple years. CIAT is part of a global network of 15 agricultural research centers in the CGIAR (Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research), which have traditionally focused on crop breeding to raise yields of staple crops around the world.  Read more >

Photo: Neil Palmer, CIAT/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0, Flickr
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With the First Lawsuit Against ExxonMobil for Climate Deception Announced, What Do We Know About Its Risk from Climate Change Impacts?

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

In the latest development on ExxonMobil’s long (and ongoing) history of deceiving the public and decision makers on climate change, the Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) announced this week that it is preparing for the first official lawsuit against the oil and petrochemical giant for its climate deception. Read more >

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