energy storage


How States Can Make Energy Storage Work for Communities

, senior energy analyst

Know of a state where policy might be moving on energy storage? Or a lawmaker interested in the potential for storage to improve people’s lives? Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) new policy brief, “How to ensure energy storage policies are equitable,” offers a policy roadmap for clean energy champions to design ways to stimulate greater deployment of energy storage—in ways that put the needs and interests of communities first. Read more >

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A wide range of stakeholders from across the country met in December 2018 to develop a set of principles to ensure equitable deployment of energy storage technologies. (Photo: Megan Rising/UCS)

Ask a Scientist: How to Ensure Underserved Communities Benefit from Energy Storage

, senior writer

This month’s Ask a Scientist column takes a look at how the revolution in energy storage technology has the potential to wean the United States off fossil fuel-powered electricity and—if implemented correctly—lower residential electric bills, strengthen resilience to power outages, and clean up the air in communities where dirty power plants are usually located. Read more >

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Residentes of East Boston protesting Eversource's proposed substation GreenRoots

Open Letter Demands Clean Energy Alternative to Risky Eversource Substation

, Senior Bilingual Energy Analyst

En español

This is the fourth of a four-part blog series on East Boston, a Controversial Substation, and Opportunities for a Clean Energy Transition.  

In recent weeks via this blog we have explored a proposal from Boston-area electric utility Eversource to locate a risky high-voltage substation in a densely populated neighborhood in East Boston. We have covered the characteristics of East Boston and the range of environmental justice issues it faces, the community’s concerns around the project, and our own analysis of a local clean energy alternative.

This blog post is aimed at the decision-makers who are tasked with determining the wisdom of allowing the project to proceed, or of requiring more information and a more reality-based exploration of risks and opportunities. Below is an open letter from Juan Ramos, a Union of Concerned Scientists colleague and a resident of East Boston, asking the Massachusetts Energy Facilities Siting Board (EFSB) to listen to the people of East Boston; to base their decision on up-to-date, transparent, and sufficient data; and not to approve the current substation proposal from Eversource. Add your name to this open letter! Read more >

GreenRoots
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A Clean Energy Alternative to a Risky Proposed Substation in East Boston

, Senior Bilingual Energy Analyst

En español

This is the third of a four-part blog series on East Boston, a Controversial Substation, and Opportunities for a Clean Energy Transition.  

Right now, utilities and other key actors in the energy sector are making critical decisions that could have implications far into our future. These decisions will either enable a transition to local clean energy or lock us in for decades to expensive, traditional, and centralized energy models.

One such decision is playing out in East Boston, as the Massachusetts Energy Facilities Siting Board (EFSB) considers a proposal from Eversource to locate a substation in the densely populated Eagle Hill neighborhood. Read more >

City of Boston
Applied Economics Clinic
UCS
UCS
UCS
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East Boston, a Controversial Substation and Opportunities Ahead

, Senior Bilingual Energy Analyst

En español

This is the second in a four-part blog series on East Boston, a Controversial Substation, and Opportunities for a Clean Energy Transition.  

We live in a world that is facing a climate crisis that is manifesting itself everywhere through record heat, floods, droughts, storms, and wildfires. United Nations scientists have predicted at least three feet of sea level rise by the end of the century, and in the Northeast, sea level increase threatens to happen even quicker. And without looking any further, this year the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has predicted for Boston 19 days of high-tide flooding without even including rain or stormy weather.

Read more >

Stantontcady
Matt Frank Photography
ISO New England, 2019 CELT Report (May 1, 2019)
UCS
Project Sunroof data explorer (November 2018)
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