extreme precipitation


Homes and businesses are surrounded by water flowing out of the Cape Fear River in the eastern part of North Carolina Sept. 17, 2018, in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. (U.S. Army Photo by Staff Sgt. Mary Junell)

Hurricane Florence: One Week Later Here’s What We Know and Here’s What’s Next

, Policy Director and Lead Economist, Climate & Energy

On the morning of September 14, Hurricane Florence made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, bringing with it record storm surge and torrential, historic amounts of rain. A week later, communities across the Carolinas are struggling with the aftermath. At least 42 people have lost their lives thus far. Heavy, lingering rainfall has caused rivers to rise for days after the storm, leading to catastrophic flooding including in inland areas. Here’s what we know so far and what we can expect in the weeks and months to come.

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Photo by Sgt. Odaliska Almonte, North Carolina National Guard Public Affairs
NC DOT
U. S. Coast Guard photograph by Auxiliarist Trey Clifton/Released.
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Three hurricanes forming in the Atlantic in 2017. Photo: NASA Earth Observatory

Hurricane Season 2018 Begins: Will it be Different From Last Year’s?

, climate scientist

Hurricane season starts Friday June 1st. I compare this year’s hurricane forecast to last year’s. Here’s how 2018 may be different. Read more >

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Flooding, Extreme Weather, and Record Temperatures: How Global Warming Puts it All Together

, climate scientist

Even though Louisiana is not among the areas that has seen the most increase in heavy precipitation events, the Southeastern US has seen an increase of 27 percent from 1958 to 2012. The straightforward explanation for heavier downpours is that warmer air can contain more water vapor than cooler air. Indeed, global measurements show that there is more water vapor in the air now. It follows that there is more water to come down when it rains. Read more >

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