Global warming


Illinois Youth Lead Strike for Climate Justice

, Energy policy analyst

A recent UN Environment Programme (UNEP) report warns that the world will miss the opportunity to stay on track towards the 1.5°C temperature goal in the Paris Agreement unless global emissions drop by 7.6 percent each year over the next decade. The report notes that solutions to reduce carbon emissions are available, and meeting our goals is possible, but we are not acting fast enough or at a large enough scale.

Instead of action, the Trump Administration is formally taking steps to pull the United States out of the Paris Climate Agreement. For this reason, it’s more important than ever for states and cities to address the climate crisis–and many of them are doing their part. Youth around the country are doing much of the work and filling the void left by the executive branch.  Read more >

Jessica Collingsworth
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Former Military Offer Insights on Extreme Heat and the Military Analysis

, Senior Climate Justice and Health Scientist

You could say that I have a personal interest in the effect of extreme heat on the military. My family is no stranger to the Armed Forces. As a matter of fact, more than 20 family members have served in the military, including my four brothers–1 in the Army, 2 in the Navy and 1 in the Air Force.

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US Military on the Front Lines of Extreme Heat

, senior climate scientist

If I were to tell you that there were nearly 2,800 cases of heat-related illness among active-duty members of the US military last year, you might not be surprised. After all, we have troops deployed throughout the Middle East, where some of the world’s hottest places are found. But what if I were to tell you that of those thousands of cases, only 67 occurred among troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan? It turns out that right here at home in the US, thousands of servicepeople suffer from heat-related illnesses like heat exhaustion and heat stroke every year, and the problem is set to grow much worse.

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Marine Corps Air Station Yuma
NBC News and InsideClimateNews
Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch
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Development to Meet San Joaquin Valley’s Population Growth, Extreme Temperature Must be Climate-Smart

, Western states senior climate analyst

Living in the San Joaquin Valley means living with heat, where historically July temperatures can regularly be 95-100°F. Over the next 30-70 years, it will get even hotter due to heat-trapping carbon emissions, primarily from the burning of fossil fuels. These higher temperatures will place additional pressure on the region’s critical infrastructure and vulnerable populations, like children, the elderly, and outdoor workers. Hotter days and nights can also stress the infrastructure that people rely on to keep cool when it is dangerously hot outside, like the electricity grid and buildings. Read more >

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Mounting Impacts on Florida Will Make It Hard for Trump to Avoid Climate Change Talk at G7

, senior climate scientist

The White House announced yesterday that “climate change will not be on the agenda” for the G7  summit. The president also announced the June 2020 event would be held at Trump National Doral Miami, the luxury hotel and golf resort he owns about 15 miles northwest of the city. Trump may want to avoid discussing climate change at next year’s G7 summit, but mounting impacts on Florida will make that difficult.

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Andreas Sandberg
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