Global warming


The USS Ashland, followed by the USS Green Bay, prepare for replenishment with the USS Wasp, not shown, in the Philippine Sea, Jan. 21, 2019. Photo: U.S. Department of Defense

10 Things the Department of Defense Needs to Include in Their New Climate Change Report

, Climate Resilience Analyst

After a dearth of action on climate change and a record year of extreme events in 2017, the inclusion of climate change policies within the annual legislation Congress considers to outline its defense spending priorities (the National Defense Authorization Act) for fiscal year 2018 was welcome progress. House and Senate leaders pushed to include language that mandated that the Department of Defense (DoD) incorporate climate change in their facility planning (see more on what this section of the bill does here and here) as well as issue a report on the impacts of climate change on military installations. Unfortunately, what DoD produced fell far short of what was mandated.

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Photo: U.S. Department of Defense
United States Government Accountability Office
The Hill
U.S. Air Force, photo by Tech. Sgt. Liliana Moreno
U.S. Department of Defense,Photo By: Lance Cpl. Isaiah Gomez
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The State of the Union on Climate Change is Not Strong

, Climate Resilience Analyst

Last Tuesday, Dan Coats, director of National Intelligence, spoke to the Senate Select Committee on National Intelligence about the annual 2019 Worldwide Threat Assessment of the US Intelligence Community report. His testimony, which stressed the grave threat climate change poses to national security, was just the latest in a long line of warnings from intelligence, military and scientific experts who President Trump continues to attack. At his State of the Union speech next week, Trump is likely to continue this pattern, once again showing his disregard for the health and safety of Americans who are already grappling with the costly and harmful impacts of climate change.

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C-Span
ODNI
Twitter
Twitter
The World Economic Forum's Global Risks Report
U.S. Air Force, by Tech. Sgt. Liliana Moreno, 621st Contingency Response Public Affairs / Published October 13, 2018
Department of Defense photo by Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Jesula Jeanlouis
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The Rush to Overbuild Gas-Fired Power

, Senior Energy Analyst

Carbon dioxide emissions rose in 2018, breaking a 3-year streak of year-on-year CO2 emission reductions. While many factors played a role in the emission increase, it was the country’s overreliance on natural gas-fired power plants that was the ultimate culprit for the uptick in 2018 electric sector emissions.

Looking forward, the latest data from a federal agency suggests that the electricity industry’s troubling trend to overbuild gas-fired power plants is only getting worse.

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UCS
Synapse Energy Economics
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Photo courtesy of General Motors

Will Koch Pull the Plug on Electric Cars?

, senior writer

When multibillionaire industrialist Charles Koch perceives a potential threat to his fossil fuel empire, he doesn’t mess around. Koch wants to kill a federal income tax credit of up to $7,500 for electric vehicle (EV) buyers for the first 200,000 EVs each automaker sells. Although EVs make up less than 2 percent of total vehicle sales nationally, 123,000 of them were snapped up in the first six months of this year, more than twice the amount sold in all of 2015, and more carmakers are expected to introduce new EV models over the next few months. Alarm bells are going off at Koch Industries headquarters. Read more >

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Photo: UCS/Audrey Eyring

Fighting Climate Change: You’re 4x As Powerful As You Think

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

The latest news on climate change is incredibly sobering stuff, and talking with my family about it hasn’t made for uplifting dinner conversation. But once you get past the initial shock, episodes like that can get you thinking about what more each of us can do. When I did, I realized that the answer is a lot—and in more ways than might occur to us. We might, in fact, be four times as powerful as we think.

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Photo: PublicSource
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