Global warming


https://www.flickr.com/photos/torley/3441813671

New NOAA Data Shows Just How Abnormal Our Climate Has Become

, senior climate scientist

Two seemingly disconnected announcements over the last few weeks are giving us a glimpse of what “normal” looks like right now in terms of our climate. In reflecting how profoundly we’re altering our climate system, NOAA’s new 30-year “climate normals” clearly show how “normal” ain’t what it used to be. And the latest report from the International Energy Agency reminds us that “normal” isn’t always a state we should be longing for. In fact, we should be pushing back hard against what’s normal right now to give our kids some semblance of a recognizable climate in the future. Here are four things to think about when considering what a “normal climate” means. Read more >

Torley Linden/flickr
NOAA Climate.gov; NCEI
NOAA Climate.gov; NCEI
Bookmark and Share

Astrid Caldas speaking at AAAS Stand Up for Science Rally in Feb. 2017 at Boston Copley Square Anthony Eyring/UCS

Who Wants to Learn More about Climate Change? All Kinds of People!

, climate scientist

Some Earth Day 2021 reflections on my work in climate science and advocacy. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Backbone Campaign/Flickr

ExxonMobil Versus Chevron: Fight for Second-to-Last Place Among Fossil Fuel Companies Has Begun

, Corporate Analyst and Engagement Specialist

Soon it will be annual general meeting (AGM) season. Much like last year, UCS will be attending the annual meetings virtually due to the pandemic. I’ll be addressing three broad themes here – EU versus US climate action, the need for climate lobbying disclosure, and Chevron and ExxonMobil’s fight to not be the worst. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Three Ways Climate Disclosure Helps Everyone

, Corporate Analyst and Engagement Specialist

Climate risk, be it physical risk from climate impacts or financial risks associated with the transition to a low-carbon economy, poses a systemic threat to the US and global economy. Corporate America, particularly the fossil fuel industry, is both contributing to climate risks and facing climate risks—which seems like a paradox the industry should pay closer attention to. The accurate and comparable disclosure of climate risks is a necessary first step in the swift and deep decarbonization that is necessary to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Disclosure on its own is not enough, as there is no silver bullet to eliminate climate risk, but disclosure is a vital part of a necessary climate package. And disclosure has real-world positive impacts for communities, investors, and the everyday person. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Imagen de satélite de Texas cubierto de nieve/NOAA

El vórtice polar ha matado a 24 en Texas hasta ahora. ¿De quién es la culpa?

, climate scientist

Mientras observamos que la mayor parte del país se ve afectada por este vórtice polar, reflexionamos si el cambio climático tiene algo que ver con él y si es más probable que ocurran estos eventos extremos en el futuro. Estamos paralizados ante las imágenes provenientes de Texas, donde el hielo se apoderó de la mayor parte de un estado que no estaba acostumbrado y, ciertamente, no estaba preparado para ello. Escuchamos sobre los cortes de energía, qué los causó (o no) y qué se debe hacer para prepararse para el próximo congelamiento. Sin embargo, cuando pensamos en eso, las perspectivas de las personas que lo están pasando son un componente importante de la historia que hay que contar.

Mi colega Maegan Ramirez es oriunda de El Paso, y tiene mucho que decir sobre la situación en Texas. Supuse que lo oiríamos en su propia voz. Read more >

NOAA
Bookmark and Share