Global warming


Hey, Oregon Senators: You Can’t Run Away from Climate Change

, director, California & Western States

In literally running away from an important vote, these Senators are fleeing their constitutionally-mandated work—and betraying their state. Read more >

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Winning at Climate Change: an Arctic and Boreal Story

, Kendall Science Fellow

Climate change is definitely not a competition, but if it were, arctic tundra and boreal forests would be crushing it by getting hotter and changing faster than the rest of the world. Read more >

NASA
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Photo: Jonathan Johannes/Flickr

Climate Change and Human Health – The Win-Win of Tackling Air Pollution

, senior climate scientist

The World Health Organization estimates that an alarming 7 million people die prematurely each year as a result of air pollution. To help tackle this issue, this year’s World Environment Day (June 5) is shining a spotlight on this environmental threat and the multiple benefits derived from tackling it. To learn more, I spoke with Sandra Cavalieri, the Coordinator of the Health Initiative of the Climate and Clean Air Coalition’s Secretariat who is contributing to World Environment Day.

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Photo: Jonathan Johannes/Flickr
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Photo: Alexander Gerst/Flickr

Hurricane Season 2019: Global Warming, Forecasts, and Probabilities

, climate scientist

According to NASA, 2018 was the 4th warmest year in a continued warming trend since record keeping began in the 1880’s, with temperatures 1.5 degrees Fahrenheit (0.83 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 1951 to 1980 mean. And with it, a string of five consecutive years have been recorded as the five warmest on record. Is climate change having an effect on hurricane season, or on hurricanes themselves? Hurricane season starts on June 1st. Let’s take a look at the latest forecasts and science. Read more >

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Photo: Julian Osley/Geograph

You Can’t Ignore the Future: 5 Reasons Climate Science Looks Beyond 2040

, senior climate scientist

Yesterday it was reported that the Trump administration is redoubling its efforts to undermine climate science. James Reilly, head of the US Geological Survey, reportedly instructed scientists in the office to limit projections of climate impacts to just 2040. Studies typically project out to 2100. It is nearly the end of May 2019.  Failing to look beyond 2040 is like pretending a baby born today won’t live past 21.  As with many life plans, like mortgages signed onto today, climate science routinely looks past the year 2040.  Here are five reasons why:

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Photo: Julian Osley/Geograph
IPCC
USGCRP NCA4 Vol II
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