health


5 Great Public Health Resources for Dealing With Extreme Heat

, senior climate scientist

These are five resources that can help you and your loved ones stay safe during an extreme heat event. You can also help keep others in your community safe, for example by checking in on elderly neighbors or other people you know who are particularly vulnerable to heat. Read more >

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Photo: Jonathan Johannes/Flickr

Climate Change and Human Health – The Win-Win of Tackling Air Pollution

, senior climate scientist

The World Health Organization estimates that an alarming 7 million people die prematurely each year as a result of air pollution. To help tackle this issue, this year’s World Environment Day (June 5) is shining a spotlight on this environmental threat and the multiple benefits derived from tackling it. To learn more, I spoke with Sandra Cavalieri, the Coordinator of the Health Initiative of the Climate and Clean Air Coalition’s Secretariat who is contributing to World Environment Day.

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Photo: Jonathan Johannes/Flickr
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Photo: CMRF Crumlin/Flickr

Sidelining Science Hurts Children

, Research scientist

When science is sidelined, there is often an underlying story of the people who are hurt by these decisions and it is often children. Read more >

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Photo: US Marines

The Time Has Come for Stronger Investment in Water Infrastructure – Especially for Underserved Communities

Sara Schwartz, , UCS

When news of the Flint water crisis broke headlines, 21 million people across the country relied on water systems that violated health standards. Low-income communities, minority populations, and rural towns disproportionately deal with barriers to safe water. Drinking water challenges are complex: failing infrastructure, polluted water sources, and low capacity utility management are all part of the issue. Read more >

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Dialogue About Risks of Environmental Exposure Begins with Taking Environmental Justice Concerns Seriously

, Climate Scientist

Public health officials are tasked with one of the most critical jobs in our modern risk society: to research, understand, educate, and help prevent the multiple and complex ways in which people are exposed to and suffer from disease. But when public health officials deflect attention away from significant sources of toxic pollutants that put people at risk (and instead blame the overexposed population’s race, lifestyle, or genetics), they do a disservice to the people they are supposed to protect. Read more >

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