Hurricane Maria


Dos años después de la catástrofe climática, Puerto Rico aparece en el mapamundi

, Climate Scientist

Durante los últimos dos años, Puerto Rico ha vivido el episodio más tumultuoso de su historia moderna. En 2017, el Huracán María pasó factura climática a una isla que ya no tenía recursos políticos, económicos ni de infraestructura (urbana, energética) para saldar tal deuda. El huracán—como me dijo un colega hace tiempo—no fué lo que destruyó a Puerto Rico: la crisis de gobernabilidad, la crisis por la agobiante deuda pública que melló servicios públicos, educativos, y sociales, así como la rentabilidad de la isla—la misma crisis que pensamos había tocado fondo durante el cierre del gobierno en 2006—fue lo que destruyó a la isla, y sus escombros fueron barridos por María. Read more >

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CienciaPR’s education specialist, Elvin Estrada, trains educators at the Boys and Girls Club of Puerto Rico on how to use the Foldscope, a low-cost paper microscope, as part of CienciaPR’s Science in Service of Puerto Rico initiative. Each of the 500 students participating in the project will receive the instrument free of charge to observe the biological diversity in a terrestrial ecosystem that was impacted by Hurricane Maria. Photo courtesy of Mónica Feliú-Mójer.

Puerto Rico: Maria’s Laboratory for Scientific Collaboration

Kimber Price, , UCS

When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017, Ubaldo Córdova-Figueroa’s primary concern was for the safety of his students and research assistants. With communications shut down, it took over a month for the professor of chemical engineering at the University of Puerto Rico–Mayagüez to contact them all. “Having no access to my students or my research-lab members was very painful because I didn’t know what was going on with them. I just wanted to know that they were fine,” he says. Everyone was okay but became anxious when research was interrupted for months. Córdova-Figueroa had to reassure them that it was okay, to relax, and wait for things to return to normal. It was, after all, a catastrophe. Read more >

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Photo: Juan Declet-Barreto

Puerto Rican Scientists and the Communities They Serve: “Resistance is Resilience”

, Climate Scientist

We are coming up on the one-year anniversary of the devastation caused by Hurricane María in Puerto Rico. As part of the Puerto Rican diaspora in the United States and like thousands more of my compatriots abroad, I spent a frustrating, depressing, and maddening year viewing the fiscal and climatic catastrophe unfold from afar, and collaborating with others in the diaspora and other sectors of American society to send emergency aid, advocate for immediate federal action, and making myself useful any way I could for Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

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Photo: Juan Declet-Barreto
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New NOAA Report Shows 2017 Was the Costliest Year on Record for US Disasters

, Policy Director and Lead Economist, Climate & Energy

Today NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center released its yearly report on “billion-dollar weather and climate disasters” that affected the US in 2017. Not surprisingly, the numbers were staggering. Read more >

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Abnormal and Catastrophic 2017 Hurricane Season Finally Over

, senior climate scientist

The official end of the 2017 North Atlantic hurricane season, November 30th, has finally arrived.  This year’s season was not normal. Read more >

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