NASA


Why NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System Matters

, senior climate scientist

Future funding for NASA’s Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) was recently cancelled, leaving the important program in jeopardy unless Congress takes action soon.

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Photo: NASA

Proposed Budget Cuts to NASA’s Earth Science Division Are Damaging for All of Us

, senior climate scientist

NASA’s Earth Science Division should be equipped with the funds it needs to carry out its critical work so that our nation can remain at the cutting edge and thrive. Read more >

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NASA Earth Science Mission. Photo: NASA

What NASA Earth Missions are on the Chopping Block? – PACE, CLARREO, OCO-3, and DSCOVR

, senior climate scientist

The President’s 2018 Budget, released March 16, 2017, ‘terminates’ NASA Earth science missions PACE, CLARREO Pathfinder, OCO-3 and DSCOVR Earth viewing instruments.  What would we lose if these NASA missions were not continued through the appropriations process and eventually the President’s signature for the 2018 fiscal year?  Safeguards to avoid eating toxic shellfish, reduce aviation disruptions and take precautions for unhealthy air quality, to name a few.  Let’s tease apart the alphabet soup of NASA missions and take a brief look at a few of their potential benefits.

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How Important is NASA Research? The World Depends on It—And So Do You

, senior climate scientist

Word has it that the NASA Earth Science program is on the chopping block. Bad decision! Read more >

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Freedom to Tweet? Government Scientists and the Right to Engage on Social Media

, Research Director, Center for Science and Democracy

Social media has done great things for science. We’ve seen it educate, advocate, and communicate on scientific issues around the world and at an unimaginable speed. Social media has allowed open science to thrive, scientists to connect, and movements to start. It allows us to organize, debate, and discuss breaking news on science-related topics. As my colleague Aaron has said, when Neil deGrasse Tyson has more Twitter followers than Seth Rogen, we know that social media has potential for communication of science. Read more >

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