natural gas


Photo: W.carter/Wikimedia Commons

If You Smell Something, Say Something: Identifying Local Natural Gas Leaks

Sarah Salois, , UCS

Walking my dog around my neighborhood one day, I caught a whiff of something very clearly – gas. At first, I noted the smell but assumed it was a fleeting odor and chalked it up to urban living. But soon I realized there was nothing fleeting about it.  I take the same route each day, and it became clear that specific locations  persistently smelled strongly of gas. Internal alarm bells went off in my head as I calculated the amount of gas necessary to be detected outside, in open air, uncontained. I asked my neighbors and the local utility company about the leaks – surely, I was not the only one who had noticed the smell, which led to my next question, what was being done about it? I was surprised to find that my neighbors had actually been smelling the leaks and alerting the utility companies for years. YEARS. I was shocked, and I wanted to know more.

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Photo: W.carter/Wikimedia Commons
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Industry Criticizing… Industry? This is What Effective Advocacy Looks Like

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

This is the first time people can recall when one of the grid operators was singled out by the others for making inappropriate demands on the industry. Read more >

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An Unseasonably “Hot” February for California’s Clean Energy Landscape

, senior analyst, Clean Energy

Major policy action for California’s electricity sector mimics the seasons: winter is a relatively quiet, reflective time and major policy developments start to bud in the spring. But lately, the weather in California and electric sector policy developments seem unseasonably hot. For example, it’s currently 75 degrees outside my office in Oakland. And this post details some of the things happening in the policy world that also seem particularly “hot.” Read more >

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Photo: Wikimedia Commons/Stevendbradley

DTE Customers Could Save $340 Million with Clean Energy Compared to Proposed Gas Plant

, senior energy analyst

DTE Energy, Michigan’s largest electric utility, came up short in its attempt to justify charging customers nearly a billion dollars for a proposed new natural gas plant. Expert analysis shows that a mix of clean energy resources would meet customers’ power needs for about $340 million less than the cost to build and run DTE’s proposed plant. Read more >

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Photo: Michael Vadon/Wikimedia

7 Things We Expect to See in Rick Perry’s Unnecessary and Biased Grid Study

, director of energy research, Clean Energy

Do you think we’re going to learn anything new in 60 days that these experts and real-world experience haven’t already answered over the past decade? Read more >

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