nuclear weapons


Coming Soon? An International Ban on Nuclear Weapons

, physicist & co-director, Global Security

In a faceoff at the United Nations yesterday, a large majority of the world’s countries voted to begin negotiations of a legal ban on the possession of nuclear weapons. The United States and the other states with nuclear weapons opposed this effort, but did not have the votes to stop it.

We applaud this vote, and the efforts that led to it. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Trimming the Fat: Obama and Nuclear Weapons Cuts

, physicist & co-director, Global Security

His advisors have apparently abandoned the idea of removing US land-based missiles from hair-trigger alert. Still on the table: cutting the US arsenal and stockpiles of weapon-usable materials. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

America’s 66-Year War (and Counting)

, China project manager and senior analyst

The “forgotten war” that institutionalized the division of the Korean peninsula—a war that has not ended—might have been avoided if the United States and the People’s Republic of China had come to terms with each other in 1949 instead of 1979. Sixty-six years on, as the Kim dynasty develops nuclear weapons, mutual suspicion between the United States and China continues to abet a perpetual state of crisis in Korea. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Obama in China: Lessons from the Red Carpet

, China project manager and senior analyst

President Obama’s precipitate decent onto a Chinese red carpet generated more media attention than what could be a planet-saving commitment to combat climate change. This triumph of the trivial raises important questions about the future of US-China relations.

Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Nuclear Weapons and the Myth of the “Re-Alerting Race”

, physicist & co-director, Global Security

One of the frustrations of trying to change policy is that frequently repeated myths can short-circuit careful thinking about current policies and keep policy makers from recognizing better alternatives.

That is particularly frustrating—and dangerous—when the topic is nuclear weapons. Read more >

Bookmark and Share