Science Advocacy


A bike lane, an MBTA bus, and the Green Line trolley in Boston
Eleanor Fort/UCS

Why Scientists Shouldn’t Heed Calls to “Stay in Our Lane”

Ben Santer, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow, , UCS

It’s hard to lose a long-term friendship. That happened to me last year. My friendship did not survive my unwillingness to “stay in my lane”. Read more >

Eleanor Fort/UCS
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Scientific Integrity, Climate Action and Environmental Justice, Oh My! Science Activists Be Proud!

, director, Center for Science & Democracy

Wednesday, January 27, 2021 was an extraordinary day for the role of science in our government and for science advocacy advocates across the country. President Biden issued Executive Orders and Presidential Memoranda that will change the course of government from inaction to action. From sidelining science to centering science in policymaking. From trumpeting racism to using the power of government to fight racial injustice. From pretending that the evidence of human-caused climate change is inconclusive to laying out actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and put us on a path to a sustainable future. Read more >

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Using Workshops as a Tool to Build Scientists’ Engagement in Policy

Jennifer Mongiovi, MS, doctoral candidate and Jessica O'Neill, PhD, MPH, co-founder, , UCS

Scientists have a lot to contribute to their communities, the environment, promoting equity and justice, protecting health and safety, and other important aspects of public life. As the Covid-19 pandemic took hold of the United States, we knew that the policy workshop we had been planning for 6 months would need to change. The Buffalo 500 Women Scientists hosted a virtual science policy workshop in May 2020. Our hope is that grassroots groups in small towns and big cities across the nation will adapt this strategy, build from it, and share what they have learned. Read more >

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Rebuild Arecibo Observatory: One Scientist’s Reflection on Advocacy and Research

Héctor G. Arce, Ph.D., Professor of Astrophysics, , UCS

On December 1, 2020, the 900-tonne platform that held most of the instruments of the Arecibo Observatory (AO) at a height of more than 500 feet above the ground came crashing down. People from all walks of life, old and young, scientists and non-scientists, for whom this iconic telescope meant so much, have watched the footage of the collapse in disbelief. Soon after the collapse, students, scientists and the general public began a campaign to rebuild the AO. Read more >

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