Science Advocacy


Photo: Rich Hayes/UCS

Sneak Peek: Five Ways to Become a Science Advocate in 2020

Valorie Aquino, March for Science; Jorge Ramos, Stanford University; Melissa Varga, Union of Concerned Scientists, , UCS

2020 is here, and it’s a big deal. With a presidential election, the escalating climate crisis, and social inequality exacerbating public health inequities, the pressure is on for all of us to raise our voices and show how science can help us solve some of our most pressing problems Read more >

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In May 2017, Ben marches with fellow Graduate Students at the University of Chicago for union recognition. Photo: Claudio Gonzáles

Our Next Generation of Scientists, Exploited

Dr. Ben Zalisko, , UCS

Our federal labor laws have a loophole: If you can get away with characterizing your employees as “students”, you don’t have to respect their right to unionize. Research institutions have been doing this to prevent graduate student workers, who are paid to teach and perform research for their institution, from forming an effective labor union. It’s a neat trick; could a “Walmart University” be on the horizon? Read more >

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From Scientist to Activist

Heather Price, , UCS

No one wants to sacrifice time and energy or become a political prisoner. Yet sacrifice of time and freedom by the great activists (MLK Jr, the suffragettes, Rosa Parks, etc…) was required to effect change. And they did not act alone. Thousands marched and sacrificed with them. You can too. Join a climate action near you on Sept 20, 2019: the Global Climate Strike. Everyone is needed. Read more >

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Women Scientists Form a Policy Advocacy Network in the Mid-Atlantic

JoEllen McBride, PhD; Kristen Gulino, Ph.D. candidate; Jewel Tomasula, PhD candidate, , UCS

Many societal challenges are rooted in structural inefficiencies and inequities that require government solutions informed by science. Women experience burden and harm from inaction in distinct ways, but our voices are underrepresented in both the advocacy and policy processes. We believe women scientists have untapped potential to leverage their expertise and perspective and to connect with their elected officials to lead discussions about policies that impact their communities. Read more >

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Under Our Noses: PFAS Contamination in Southern Colorado

Rev. Ryan K. Nelson, , UCS

I was born an only child in Colorado Springs, Colorado in 1979. My father, who is a retired military officer, moved us from coast-to-coast and across the country until we finally returned home in 1989. By the time I was 20, I had traveled and seen parts of the Western world that continue to enrich my life. However, Colorado has always held me safe, secure, and nestled in the Rocky Mountains as I continued to mature into adulthood. The quiet solitude the outdoors here provided me just as much ecological insight as scuba diving in the Grand Caymans or walking along the coasts of Hawaii. Now I’ve seen the delicate balance of nature in Colorado disrupted by devastating wildfires and operations from fracking plus other continued operations of big oil and gas.   Read more >

Photo: FEMA
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