Learn more about sea level rise


My family has owned this home on the Jersey Shore for four generations. Photo: Amanda Devecka-Rinear

The Fate of My Grandmother’s Home: Facing Sea Level Rise in New Jersey

Amanda Devecka-Rinear,

I live in my Grandmother’s house. We are lucky. My family has owned this home on the Jersey Shore for four generations. After my parents divorced when I was two, my Grandmother’s home was my home. Read more >

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Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina. Photo: NPS

If You Can’t Censor It, Bury It: DOI Tries to Make a Stark New Study on Rising Seas Invisible

, deputy director, Climate & Energy Program

A new National Park Service (NPS) report is unequivocal that human-caused climate change has significantly increased the rate of sea level rise that is putting coastal sites at risk. But the study is difficult to find on the web and the report’s lead author, Maria Caffrey of the University of Colorado, says she had to fight to keep many scientific statements about climate change in the final version. Read more >

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Ice sheets on land in Greenland and Antarctica are melting, adding water to the world's oceans. Photo: NASA

Here’s Why Seas Are Rising. Somebody Remind the Wall Street Journal.

Scott Denning,

The science is crystal clear on the causes of sea level rise. A recent commentary in the Wall Street Journal gets it wrong on all counts. Read more >

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Sea Level Rise Will Make Oregon’s Existing Flooding Problems Worse

, climate scientist

In 2013 Annie Pollard opened her pub, the 7 Devils Brewing Co., in Coos Bay, Oregon. Less than two years later, the pub flooded during a heavy rain that coincided with a high tide, and Pollard found herself stacking sandbags and mopping up floodwaters. While high tide flooding is relatively infrequent in Coos Bay, when it does occur, businesses like Pollard’s are at risk, and inundated roads cause traffic in town to snarl. Pollard and other business owners are acutely aware that such floods could become a much bigger problem for Coos Bay in the future. Read more >

JXBauer/Flickr
Rob More for the Oregon King Tides Photo Project
Oregon Global Warming Commission
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3 Questions Worth Answering in the Wake of Winter Storm Grayson

, senior analyst, Climate & Energy Program

Yesterday in Massachusetts we were asking ourselves questions that have rarely, if ever, needed asking.

What happens when half-frozen seawater suddenly floods onto roadways? Can something the consistency of a milkshake and 3 feet deep be plowed? There’s a large dumpster floating down the street… What depth of water is sufficient to do that? What happens if some of this water freezes in place before it retreats (as I write this, the temps have plummeted to 12 degrees F and dropping)? Will those cars now filled with seawater in the snow-emergency parking lot run again? What if the water freezes inside them over the weekend, can that punch out doors? Read more >

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