stand up for science


The New Government Omnibus Spending Bill Shows that Science Advocacy Matters

, Washington representative, Center for Science and Democracy

After a long wait, late last night, Congress posted a spending agreement for the rest of the 2018 fiscal year. For the most part, we achieved significant victories, especially given the challenging political environment, in repelling proposals that would have directly undermined the role of science in public health and environmental policymaking.

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Photo: UCS/Audrey Eyring

A Year of Resistance—and Why I’m Hopeful for 2018

, Policy Director and Lead Economist, Climate & Energy

What a year it’s been. The destructive antics of the Trump administration and Congress and a political discourse increasingly polluted by ‘alternative facts’ have frequently made many of us angry, sad, and sometimes just plain crazy.

Through it all, it’s been inspiring to see a resistance movement gather strength and show its muscle. I’ve been awed by the work of racial justice activists, scientists, grassroots groups, immigrant rights groups, youth groups and many many others. Here’s a snapshot of what a year in the resistance looked like for me. Read more >

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2017: Standing Up for Science—and Chalking Up Some Wins

, Editorial Director

In 2017, UCS’s efforts to build a healthier, safer, more sustainable world faced some of the toughest obstacles we’ve ever encountered. But it was also the year one million people around the world took to the streets in marches extolling the importance of science. Here are some fact-based reasons to take heart as 2017 draws to a close. Read more >

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Environmental Injustice in the Early Days of the Trump Administration

Britt Paris and Rebecca Lave, , UCS

When the EPA was established in 1970 by Richard Nixon, there was no mandate to examine why toxic landfills were more often placed near low-income, Black, Latino, immigrant, and Native American communities than in more affluent, white neighborhoods. Nor was there much recognition that communities closer to toxic landfills, refineries, and industrial plants often experienced higher rates of toxics-related illnesses, like cancer and asthma.

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Pesticide Action Network
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