Western US States

The Western United States is no stranger to climate change. But it’s also on the cutting edge of climate change policy—and we’re the lead scientist.


Photo: Juliwatson /Pixabay

100% Clean Electricity in Washington State: Everything You Need To Know

, Energy analyst

Washington state’s lawmakers are contemplating the transition to 100% clean electricity. Fortunately, Washington’s grid is already one of the cleanest in the nation, with much of its electricity coming from hydropower. So what exactly does “100% clean electricity” mean for the state? How would this transition affect Washington’s economy? And why should Washington do this in the first place?

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Photo: Juliwatson /Pixabay
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Voting on I-1631? Here’s How Much Healthier You Could Make Washington’s Climate

, Senior Climate Scientist

The Pacific Northwest has already warmed by at least 1.5°F since the first half of the 20th century. How will I-1631 help? Read more >

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California Takes Another Run at 100 Percent Clean Electricity

, Senior energy analyst

Last year, SB 100 passed the California State Senate, but stalled in the Assembly. The good news today is: it’s now scheduled for a hearing on July 3rd! Read more >

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A grid operation control room. Photo: CAISO

Solar and Wind Need a Larger Electric Grid—and California Might Just Create One

, Senior energy analyst

Over the past decade, thousands of megawatts of clean renewable energy have been installed in the West thanks to the declining cost of wind and solar power and state policies like the Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS). Since solar and wind power are by their nature intermittent, large quantities of weather-dependent generation require new solutions to maintain grid reliability while keeping costs low. Read more >

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California State Capitol
Photo: Rafał Konieczny CC-BY-SA-4.0 (Wikimedia)

California’s Clean Fuels Standard Poised to Get Even Better

, Senior scientist

Next month, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) is considering amendments to extend and strengthen the state’s pioneering Low Carbon Fuels Standard (LCFS).  The LCFS works in concert with other climate and vehicle policies to cut oil use and transportation emissions by promoting the use of cleaner transportation fuels ranging from biofuels to renewable electricity.

CARB staff’s proposal to the board would extend the policy to 2030 and double the emissions reduction target from a 10 percent reduction in average fuel carbon intensity in 2020 to a 20 percent reduction in 2030.  CARB is also increasing opportunities for renewable electricity and adopting rules to account for carbon capture and storage (CCS) used in the production of transportation fuels. Read more >

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