Western US States

The Western United States is no stranger to climate change. But it’s also on the cutting edge of climate change policy—and we’re the lead scientist.


California State Capitol
Photo: Rafał Konieczny CC-BY-SA-4.0 (Wikimedia)

California’s Clean Fuels Standard Poised to Get Even Better

, Senior scientist

Next month, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) is considering amendments to extend and strengthen the state’s pioneering Low Carbon Fuels Standard (LCFS).  The LCFS works in concert with other climate and vehicle policies to cut oil use and transportation emissions by promoting the use of cleaner transportation fuels ranging from biofuels to renewable electricity.

CARB staff’s proposal to the board would extend the policy to 2030 and double the emissions reduction target from a 10 percent reduction in average fuel carbon intensity in 2020 to a 20 percent reduction in 2030.  CARB is also increasing opportunities for renewable electricity and adopting rules to account for carbon capture and storage (CCS) used in the production of transportation fuels. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

An Unseasonably “Hot” February for California’s Clean Energy Landscape

, Senior energy analyst

Major policy action for California’s electricity sector mimics the seasons: winter is a relatively quiet, reflective time and major policy developments start to bud in the spring. But lately, the weather in California and electric sector policy developments seem unseasonably hot. For example, it’s currently 75 degrees outside my office in Oakland. And this post details some of the things happening in the policy world that also seem particularly “hot.” Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Pruitt’s EPA Attempts to Undermine California’s Leadership on Vehicle Standards

, senior vehicles analyst

The current EPA administration has repeatedly mischaracterized California’s authority and role when it comes to vehicle emissions standards—here is what that really means for California and the country writ large. Read more >

BlueGreen Alliance and NRDC
Bookmark and Share

Sea Level Rise Will Make Oregon’s Existing Flooding Problems Worse

, senior climate scientist

In 2013 Annie Pollard opened her pub, the 7 Devils Brewing Co., in Coos Bay, Oregon. Less than two years later, the pub flooded during a heavy rain that coincided with a high tide, and Pollard found herself stacking sandbags and mopping up floodwaters. While high tide flooding is relatively infrequent in Coos Bay, when it does occur, businesses like Pollard’s are at risk, and inundated roads cause traffic in town to snarl. Pollard and other business owners are acutely aware that such floods could become a much bigger problem for Coos Bay in the future. Read more >

JXBauer/Flickr
Rob More for the Oregon King Tides Photo Project
Oregon Global Warming Commission
Bookmark and Share

Image of California's Capitol Building

Governor Brown Aims to Boost California’s Leadership on Electric Cars

, research and deputy director, Clean Vehicles

California has long been seen a leader on EVs of all kinds – plug-in hybrids, battery electric and fuel cell vehicles. The state established the first requirements for zero emission vehicles in 1990 and has been pushing the industry forward ever since. Governor Brown’s executive order last week gives another jolt to EV deployment in the state with a call for $2.5 billion in investments in infrastructure and consumer incentives over the next 8 years with the aim of reaching 5 million zero emissions vehicles by 2030 and the build out of 250,000 charging stations and 200 hydrogen refueling stations by 2025. Read more >

Bookmark and Share