wind power


Photo: Zbynek Burival/Unsplash

Xcel Energy’s Plan to Eliminate Coal and Boost Solar in Minnesota

, lead Midwest energy analyst

Today, Xcel Energy released a preliminary plan to phase out its remaining coal-fired power plants in Minnesota and replace them primarily with wind, solar, and energy efficiency—moving the company forward toward its goal of 100% carbon-free electricity by 2050.

Part of the plan involves a consensus proposal joined by the Union of Concerned Scientists, other clean energy organizations, and the Laborers International Union of North America.

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Photo by Zbynek Burival on Unsplash
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Photo: AWEA

How Big is Gridlock in our Electric Grid?

, Senior energy analyst

Progress in electric power, particularly the growth of renewable energy and consumer choice, is looking like gridlock.  Look closer and we can see three fundamental issues: state policy vs. federal policy; changing perspectives on reliability, and how electric grid planning should accommodate the ongoing transition to renewable energy. We even have gridlock in the appointment and continuity of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) that oversees much of the decision making in these spaces.

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Photo: AWEA
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Credit: J. Rogers/UCS

5 Wind Power Facts (From Better Sources Than President Trump)

, Senior energy analyst

It may be hard to believe, but our president is getting even more outrageous in his claims about wind power—whether it’s ignoring the reality of how our electricity system actually works or fabricating lies about non-existent health risks. Turns out there are more credible resources than him for good information about wind. Here are five things to know about wind power, and solid sources for deeper dives. Read more >

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Getting to 100% Clean Energy—and the Grid Operators that Stand in the Way

, Senior energy analyst

Who is in charge, and where are they leading us? Read more >

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Photo: William Hope

Wind vs. Gas: Winter Wind Beats New Pipelines

, Senior energy analyst

With the cold weather upon us, and a lot of debate about how to supply our energy needs, we can take a look at the power of wind.  Wind is actually stronger in the wintertime when it gets colder. The advantages of using wind to reduce natural gas needs in cold weather are real, and especially relevant to the debate over whether or not it makes sense to invest more into gas pipelines.

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Photo: William Hope
photo by Mike Jacobs
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