Astrid Caldas

Climate scientist

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Astrid Caldas is a climate scientist with the Climate & Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Her research focuses on climate change adaptation with practical policy implications for ecosystems, the economy, and society. See Astrid's full bio

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October 17, 2016 tidal flooding on a sunny day during the "king tides" in Brickell, Miami, FL that peaked at four feet MLLW. Photo: Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0.

Sea Level Rise and High-Tide Flooding Outlook Make It to NOAA’s Climate Update

On June 15, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) held its Monthly Climate Update press conference, in which it releases the global temperature for the previous month. The big piece of information in this press conference usually comes on the very first slide of their presentation, which includes the measured global temperature for the month, and how much it deviates from the 20th century average of 58.7°F. Read more >

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The 2017 Hurricane Season Begins: Here Are 3 Alarming Things I’m Watching

There are so many things happening in the world and in the US that we have a lot to digest. However, one of the things that should be on everyone’s radar – whether you live on the coast or not – is the 2017 hurricane season, which starts June 1st. Why? Read on.

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April 2017 Was the Second Hottest April on Record: We Need NOAA More Than Ever

We are still seeing warming that is basically unprecedented. Read more >

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Climate Enters Uncharted Territory—But We Can Prepare for the Risks Global Warming Brings

The World Meteorological Organization recently released its State of The Global Climate for 2016. There was a wealth of information in it: a new temperature record (approximately 1.1 °C above the pre-industrial period and 0.06 °C above the previous record set in 2015), CO2 new highs (400.0 ± 0.1 ppm in the atmosphere at the end of 2015), unprecedented global sea-ice extent (more than 4 million km2 below average in November), and global sea level rise in early 2016 values making new records (with plenty of coral bleaching and acidification). Although the facts are sobering, we can prepare for the risks that global warming will bring. Read more >

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NOAA and NASA Confirm: 2016 Is Warmest Year on Record.

NASA and NOAA held a press conference today, where they confirmed what had been anticipated for a few months now: 2016 broke all records, and is officially the warmest year. Read more >

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