California


El Niño Won’t Fill Up California’s Critical Groundwater Reservoirs

, climate scientist

El Niño is hitting California at last, bringing the pitter-patter of rain, snowy mountains, and more wet weather in the weeks ahead. For me, El Niño’s arrival the last couple of weeks has been an opportunity to introduce my toddler to the joy of splashing in puddles—which have been practically nonexistent since she was born. Read more >

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California’s Complicated Relationship with Natural Gas

, senior analyst, Clean Energy

Two-thirds of U.S. states may be at risk of relying too heavily on natural gas to meet electricity demand, according to a new analysis from the Union of Concerned Scientists. Why, might you ask, is California, a national and global leader in the move to clean energy, included in that mix of at-risk states? Read more >

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Sustainable Groundwater Management: Measurable Objectives Can Provide a Roadmap for California

, climate scientist

Today, UCS is releasing Measuring What Matters: Setting Measurable Objectives to Achieve Sustainable Groundwater Management in California. Read more >

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California Can Reach 50% Renewable Energy: New UCS Analysis Shows Pathways and Solutions

, senior analyst, Clean Energy

This summer, Californians have not been able to ignore the evidence of climate change affecting our lives. Historic drought and searing temperatures have turned the Golden State into a tinderbox, escalating wildfires and placing serious strain on the state’s agricultural economy. Read more >

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Crazy Hot Days, Crazy Warm Nights: A New Study on Climate Change in California’s Central Valley

, former scientist and Kendall Science Fellow

Last week I, along with an international group of scientists, published a study in the journal Climatic Change in which we found that the hottest summer days (24 hour periods) in the Central Valley were twice as likely to occur due to climate change. Heat waves in California’s Central Valley have become progressively more severe in recent decades due to  higher humidity and warmer nighttime temperatures. Observations obtained from NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center show that Central Valley nighttime temperatures were nearly 2°F (1°C) warmer in the 2000s compared to the 1901-1960 average and even higher for the whole of California (see plot below). Read more >

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