voting


Chris Phan/Wikimedia Commons

New Study Shows Benefits of Voting by Mail

, Kendall Science Fellow

As we think about how to manage this crisis, a timely new study by political scientists Adam Bonica, ​Jacob M. Grumbach​, Charlotte Hill​ and Hakeem Jefferson demonstrates positive effects on voter turnout from Colorado’s approach to voting: universal vote-by-mail. Read more >

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Activism in Hard Times

Millions of us marched in the streets. We called on elected leaders to act on climate, healthcare, racism, and inequality. The election season was in full swing. We wondered if our dreams would fit in a ballot box. As we prepared to cast our votes, the Coronavirus pandemic changed everything.

We are now coming to terms with the fact that nothing about our politics and public policies can be taken for granted. Yet, for many, politics have never offered any guarantees.

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Omari Spears/UCS
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Omari Spears/UCS

States Need to Update Emergency Election Plans, Scientists Need to Step Up

, Kendall Science Fellow

Even if the U.S. is successful at managing Coronavirus infection rates and lethality, it has the capacity to wreak havoc on the November election. Introducing all this uncertainty into an already close election is sure to amplify claims of voter suppression and voter fraud. If the election is contested and the results inconclusive, the political epidemic could be just as dangerous as the biological one. Read more >

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You Can Fix #UnhealthyDemocracy in 2020

, Kendall Science Fellow

If you want to restore evidence-based policymaking in government and promote science for the public good, it is going to take more than voting this year. The electoral process itself is under attack in many states, and nearly a decade of partisan gerrymandering and erosion of voting rights has crippled the public’s ability to hold elected policymakers accountable. Read more >

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Mike Olliver/UCS

Dear Students of STEM, I Challenge You to Vote!

, Research scientist

So, did students vote more in 2004 than in prior years? Yes, they did; however, when voter turnout data was analyzed across student identified majors, social scientists found students studying science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) had the lowest turnout rates. This was also the case in 2012, 2016, and 2018 elections. Read more >

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