wind energy


Photo: Johanna Montoya/Unsplash

Hitting 1 Trillion. Think Clean Electrons, Not Stylish Electronics

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

You may have heard that Apple just passed the $1 trillion mark in terms of its market capitalization, the first company ever to reach those lofty heights. Less ink has been spilled on a different 1 trillion figure, but it’s one that’s well worth noting, too. According to Bloomberg NEF (BNEF), we just shot past the headline-worthy figure of 1 trillion watts (that is, 1 million megawatts, or 1,000 gigawatts) of wind turbines and solar panels worldwide. And you can bet there’ll be another trillion watts right behind.

Read more >

Photo: Johanna Montoya/Unsplash
Photo: PublicSource
Bookmark and Share

Industry Criticizing… Industry? This is What Effective Advocacy Looks Like

, senior energy analyst, Climate & Energy Program

This is the first time people can recall when one of the grid operators was singled out by the others for making inappropriate demands on the industry. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

What’s My State Doing About Solar and Wind? New Rainbow Graphic Lets You Know

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

Our new “rainbow mountain” graphic lets you see your state’s piece of solar and wind’s quickly growing contribution to the US electricity mix. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

Thinking Big: Wind Industry Is Moving to Taller Turbines. Will the Transmission System Be Ready?

, senior energy analyst

The wind industry is shifting to taller, more efficient turbines. When looking to the future, we should be thinking even bigger. Read more >

Bookmark and Share

What Can Hydro and Wind Imports Do for New England? New Study Brings New Numbers to the Debate

, senior energy analyst, Clean Energy

With a major natural gas pipeline project in Massachusetts being put on hold last week, Massachusetts’s electricity future is a hot topic. A new study looks at pieces of the electricity policies in play in the state, and comes to some pretty positive conclusions. Like the Union of Concerned Scientists’ own recent study on Massachusetts and energy, this new work suggests that more renewable energy is likely to be a good deal, in a lot of different ways. Read more >

Bookmark and Share